A glass of champagne being poured behind a plate of food

Leigh Street

Leigh Street connects two of Adelaide's busiest streets, Hindley and Currie, and is a one-way, traffic free, cobblestone street packed full of character-laden and heritage buildings with links to the history of Adelaide and South Australia.

By day, Leigh Street is a popular thoroughfare for city workers, university students, locals and tourists. Cafes and restaurants sprawl their tables and chairs onto the pavement and are packed for coffee in the morning, lunch at midday and a drink in the afternoon. Iconic retailers, barbers and businesses, some of who have been on Leigh Street for 40 years, make up the rest.

By night, Leigh Street is a popular haunt for its well-known bar scene. Small and intimate wine and cocktail bars sit side-by-side all the way down the street, working with each other to create the perfect bar hopping destination.

Building of the first section of Government House began in 1839. Prior to this, the Governor John Hindmarsh, and then his successor George Gawler, lived in a three-roomed wattle and daub cottage with calico ceiling.

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Situated in Gawler Place North, the sleek Gawler Place Canopy provides a purpose-built location for the diverse range of pop-ups, activations and events hosted in Rundle Mall throughout the year.

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Salvador Dalí's three-tonne, seven-metre tall masterpiece 'Triumphant Elephant' has taken up residence in Rundle Mall, showcasing the famed surrealist artist's vision of otherwordliness and subverted imagery that has resonated with audiences around the world.

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Parliament House is open to the public and gives visitors the chance to explore one of the city's most impressive buildings while learning about the political past, present and future of the region and Australia.

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