Queen Adelaide Club

Adelaide Club and Queen Adelaide Club

Walk too fast and you might miss the home of Adelaide’s ‘establishment’ on North Terrace.

Discreetly fronting Adelaide’s cultural boulevard, the Adelaide Club was built in 1864 and remains one of the few exclusive bastions in an otherwise progressive and relatively egalitarian city.

Its membership has included parliamentarians, leading businessmen, merchants and pastoralists.

Just down the road, on the corner of Stephens Place, is its companion club for ‘establishment’ women, the Queen Adelaide Club.

Initially used as residences and doctors’ consulting rooms, the associated buildings date back to the late 1800s and early 1900s.

For nearly 150 years, Adelaide Oval has been regarded as one of the most picturesque sporting grounds in the world. It is a South Australian icon, and one of the most advanced, state-of-the-art outdoor venues in Australia.

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Building of the first section of Government House began in 1839. Previous to this, the Governor —John Hindmarsh and then his successor George Gawler— lived in a three-roomed wattle and daub cottage with calico ceiling.

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The 4m tall structure, known officially as 'The Spheres' by Bert Flugelman, consists of two large stainless steel spheres with a diameter of 2.15 metres, balanced one on top of the other.

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As Adelaide’s new cultural canvas, The Rundle Lantern is a spectacular and invigorating creation attracting residents and visitors alike.

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